What Does Throat Cancer Look Like

    throat cancer

  • The term head and neck cancer refers to a group of biologically similar cancers originating from the upper aerodigestive tract, including the lip, oral cavity (mouth), nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, pharynx, and larynx.
  • Cancer that forms in tissues of the pharynx (the hollow tube inside the neck that starts behind the nose and ends at the top of the windpipe and esophagus).

    look like

  • bear a physical resemblance to; “She looks like her mother”
  • Goon Affiliated is the fourth studio album by American rapper Plies. The album was released by Atlantic Records on June 8, 2010.
  • To seem; To be similar in appearance to; resemble

what does throat cancer look like

what does throat cancer look like – You Look

You Look Like A Teacher
You Look Like A Teacher
PROCEEDS from the sale of this Kindle Single support both children’s charities and the sons and daughters of America’s service members deployed overseas.

FROM THE INTRODUCTION

The average high school student in the United States will have at least 28 different teachers before graduating—add coaches, counselors, and administrators to the mix and the number is probably closer to 40 or 50—and the average student will spend more than 20,000 hours directly under the influence of these professional educators. In other words: the ability and power that teachers have to intrigue, inspire, and influence young minds are quite real.

But what does a teacher look like?

It’s simple: we’re products of the same education systems where we now teach, but we’re hardly automatons. In fact, teachers today make up one of the most diverse workplace groups in the professional world. Yes, we’re products of the same systems, but we’re also professionals with varied backgrounds and long memories of our own childhoods seared into our souls. In large part, we are teachers precisely because we remember what it was like to be a student. Someone inspired us. Someone influenced us. Or someone hurt us. And we’ve channeled that joy (or pain) into our own unique philosophies on life and learning and we’re always looking for an opportunity to share them—with each other, our students, parents, or in our communities.

You Look Like A Teacher is a glaring reality check—it is the honest thoughts and ideas of professional educators who seek nothing more than to reify the modern classroom experience for a public that wants nothing less than the best in education for its children. The task of teaching has never been more complex and the expectations that burden teachers are carried out in antiquated systems that offer little support—and yet, teachers are finding success every day.

In this first volume of You Look Like A Teacher we share the stories that brought us into the classroom. In future volumes we will share stories that range from heartbreaking to hilarious, but they all share one common thread—that today’s teachers, against overwhelming odds, are standing strong in the trenches and making a difference one student at a time.

PROCEEDS from the sale of this Kindle Single support both children’s charities and the sons and daughters of America’s service members deployed overseas.

FROM THE INTRODUCTION

The average high school student in the United States will have at least 28 different teachers before graduating—add coaches, counselors, and administrators to the mix and the number is probably closer to 40 or 50—and the average student will spend more than 20,000 hours directly under the influence of these professional educators. In other words: the ability and power that teachers have to intrigue, inspire, and influence young minds are quite real.

But what does a teacher look like?

It’s simple: we’re products of the same education systems where we now teach, but we’re hardly automatons. In fact, teachers today make up one of the most diverse workplace groups in the professional world. Yes, we’re products of the same systems, but we’re also professionals with varied backgrounds and long memories of our own childhoods seared into our souls. In large part, we are teachers precisely because we remember what it was like to be a student. Someone inspired us. Someone influenced us. Or someone hurt us. And we’ve channeled that joy (or pain) into our own unique philosophies on life and learning and we’re always looking for an opportunity to share them—with each other, our students, parents, or in our communities.

You Look Like A Teacher is a glaring reality check—it is the honest thoughts and ideas of professional educators who seek nothing more than to reify the modern classroom experience for a public that wants nothing less than the best in education for its children. The task of teaching has never been more complex and the expectations that burden teachers are carried out in antiquated systems that offer little support—and yet, teachers are finding success every day.

In this first volume of You Look Like A Teacher we share the stories that brought us into the classroom. In future volumes we will share stories that range from heartbreaking to hilarious, but they all share one common thread—that today’s teachers, against overwhelming odds, are standing strong in the trenches and making a difference one student at a time.

Hanging out with the second Dad, check-up on Christmas Eve!

Hanging out with the second Dad, check-up on Christmas Eve!
Today, December 24/2010, I went to the Janeway for a check-up! I had to get the regular stuff done.. Bloodwork, and CT scan on my neck, chest, stomach, and pelvis.

Funny story surrounds this though…
I go into the Janeway hospital at 10am, turns out I forgot my MCP and my Janeway card, and the place that usually makes them down the hall from the blood lab was closed.
Normally they wouldn’t even look at you, but since the nurses know me so well, they just put me in the system anyways..but when they put my name in the computer to see what type of bloodwork I needed to get done, NOTHING SHOWED UP. Turns out I wasn’t entered in the system to have a check-up today even though my mother and I had recieved a slip through the mail telling us to do so.
So, the tech’s went through the computers, and backtracked and said I was scheduled to get a scan NOVERMBER 24. I guess poor Gale (head oncologist nurse) entered the wrong month by an accident!!! haahahaha
There was a lot of paging involved, and a lot of people saying "Only cause it’s you." but I managed to get my stuff done today. :)

Bev was into bloodwork, it was so good to see her again, and they got my blood first try. I was very pleased. Considering almost every time someone tries to take blood, or put an IV in me it takes about 6 tries. I was so pleased it took 1.
That was a relief, but then I just thought "crap… I still need to get an IV for my CT scan." BUT Byron was working!!!! :):) and he got it in first try as well. It was great. I saw so many great people today who I missed dearly.

Even though a lot of people hate hospitals, and hate being there, I love visiting the janeway…When I was recieving treatments the nurses were calling it my second home, when I re-visit I still feel like it is. I am always welcomed with such kind hearts. Always. Everyone just runs over to me, grabs my face, kisses my cheeks, and tells me how great I look. I saw all the nurses up to j4, I saw the blood lab techs, I was speaking to Gale the head oncology nurse and I showed her my tattoo!! haha she loved it, I saw Eden the playroom lady :), and the intern who used to always watch Seinfeld with me when I was recieving treatments!!!! It was so great to see everyone. Oh, and of course I saw Barry. The guy I’m with in the picture. Sorry about the state of the picture I realize it’s pretty blurry, but my mommy took it and she’s learning so give her a break ;)
Barry and I talked forever. I mean, we still talk on facebook chat and everything while I’m away in Calgary but it was so fantastic to actually see him again. :)

I love the people in that building. Such an admiration for all of the people there. They truly are amazing, each and every one of them. ♥

The CT scan itself was also really well. The tech’s were all so funny…and I know I should be used to this by now considering all of the CT scan’s I have had to get, but I am STILL not used to the warm dye. I’m not sure if I wrote about this before, but when you have to get a CT scan (or at least a CT scan for your neck, chest, stomach, and pelvis) you need to drink this huge bottle of water with dye in it (this bottle of water also makes you get really REALLY cold, hence the blanket over me in the photo), wait 40 minutes, and then once you’re in the CT scan, the tech’s inject dye into your system through IV, and this dye lights up your insides so the scanner can pick up things that it otherwise wouldn
t, and when this dye is going through, it’s absolutely wild. You get this warm sensation, like, you don’t even feel the liquid going in your veins in your wrist, you just feel warm starting at your throat, and then it goes down your body until it reaches your pelvis, and when it reaches your pelvis, it’s crazy. It feels like your peeing. The dye is strongest there, so down there you get extremely warm, and I remember the first time I got the CT scan I said to the tech "I think I’m peeing!!" and he was like "No, it just feels like it, it’s the dye." and I was just like "NO WAY I am definitely peeing. I feel like I’m peeing." Buuuuuut, I wasn’t. hahaha, such a weird feeling! It’s kind of cool though? I’ll never get used to it. :P

well, I got my CT scan and bloodwork done, on Christmas eve, and now i have to go back for my results on new years eve! haha, I guess that’s all you can do when I only have a few weeks in Newfoundland. :)

Love everyone in the janeway so much
excited to recieve results next week
considering I’ve been thinking weird lately O_o
I wouldn’t be too worried though, I’m just paranoid sometimes! haha :)

Merry Christmas everyone!!!!!!
♥♥♥♥

myboyscout2

myboyscout2
After doing the Bible photo as something with meaning to me, and saying how I was going to do the kids… I thought about my son. Then I looked at him, all decked out in his boy scout uniform and I asked him so sit against the wall and he was more than willing for me.

All of my children (all four) mean the world to me of course. This boy, my only boy, Bailey he is also my hero.

When Bailey was three years old, right after Thanksgiving in 04 he got sick. Super sick. My little boys child like gleam was gone from his eyes, he was complaining of headaches, not playing and starting to look pale to us.

When we went to the doctor that day I was expecting to hear the flu, or strep throat a bad ear infection. I was expecting nothing horrible. I was not expecting what I heard.

They took blood from him, and then said they were taking extra, to test for a few other things, including mono. The doctor had said something to the nurse about how his liver seemed to be swollen. My husband said to me "if they say he needs a liver transplant I will fall to the ground dead." I quickly told him to STOP being an idiot and that they thought it might be mono. Scary as that might be, its what I was hoping for…

"We think your son has cancer." The doctor said when he came back into the room with blood results. I almost passed out I remember hearing my husband flip a little bit, and I Just knelt to the doctors table with my son and I prayed. I prayed for God to be with my son. Please God. Be with my son.

Bailey was very anemic, and he had way too many white blood cells for a normal count. We were to pack and go to Childrens hospital, not the next day, not that evening after dinner… "Just go home, pack and GO"

I am not sure what was going through our minds. Finding someone to watch our other three children, calling family for prayers and the need for financial support, we packed items to last 2 days, they told us we would be at the hospital more than likely a week, if not weeks. Still we packed 2 days worth of things and left.

Many tests were done on Bailey, a spinal tap, bone marrow was drawn from his little hip bones, not to mention blood. He was given an IV to give him platelets he so greatly needed and plasma and IV fluids.

The diagnosis came back that he had Acute Lymphatic Leukemia. Which the doctors said, if your going to get cancer, is the one to get.

He was started on Chemo, and Steroids, antibiotics, more blood, more plasma, more platelets. He was a grumpy boy. He was taken to surgery to have a port put in place to the life saving drugs could get to him faster, easier and with less pain.

He went through SO much. SO fast. He was a growing boy. He lost much of his hair, he had mood swings, he was so so sick. He was always so strong though, he never gave up. Within a month his Leukemia had went into remission, this was not the end of treatments by any means, but this was a start in him feeling better.

There were times when he could not leave the house, or had to wear a mask, but even then he did not complain and when we did go out, he played and ran and jumped just like any other boy out there, no one that didn’t know what he was going through even had a clue that anything was wrong with him. In fact when I would tell people, they were shocked.

It has now been 6 years (new years eve) since he has went into remission. He has been off all treatments for 2 years I believe now, and he has been doing fantastic. I have high hopes that we have seen the end of this thing called cancer with him.

I can only pray he continues to live his life to the fullest and he has taught us all to never take anything for granted. You never know how long you have, so cherish each moment!

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